Denise and her blog


Denise Tiran FRCM, is an international authority on midwifery complementary therapies.

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The Misuse of Complementary Therapies

Published : 14/02/2021

 

Today, Denise expresses her continued concern about the continuing misuse of complementary therapies and and reinforces the need for both complementary and conventional health practitioners work within their professional boundaries. She says: 

 

I continue to see some extremely alarming social media comments and suggestions on the use of complementary therapies. Some of the posts recently have included:

 

  • A woman whose husband is in intensive care being ventilated for Covid, whose nurses agreed that it was acceptable for her to bring in an essential oil diffuser to “ease his breathing”. This is one of the most worrying incidents I have seen. Whist diffusion of specific oils may aid respiration for people recovering from Covid at home, the very fact that this man is in ITU means that he needs specialist medical and nursing care and aromatherapy is completely contraindicated at this time. Further, it is frankly irresponsible of the nursing staff to agree to this: obviously they have no understanding of the dangers of diffusing oils in an area where people are in life-threatening conditions and how they may affect, not only this man, but other patients in the unit.
     
  • Various reflexology “professional” groups with numerous questions asking whether reflexology can “heal” particular medical conditions or  what reflexology treatment should be done to treat specific medical conditions. These questions are usually followed by numerous helpful suggestions from therapists who obviously do not understand the pathology of the conditions being discussed and do not appreciate their professional boundaries. Some of the conditions mentioned are so serious that the reflexologist should not be treating them at all yet there appear to be no posts urging caution, just total amateurish enthusiasm. In any case, reflexologists are not permitted to treat medical conditions unless they have undertaken extra training, are insured and preferably also communicate with the relevant medical doctor.
     
  • Reflexologists posting pictures of feet and asking what various changes mean, for example, lines, bulges or cracks on the feet. I have discussed this before and it worries me that these people make sweeping statements and  giving supposed “diagnoses” without any knowledge of the person’s history, symptoms or other factors that need to be taken into account when treating clients.
     
  • Certain essential oil companies advocating that oils can be taken by mouth as medicines. Again, this irresponsible publicly-available information is extremely dangerous and risks causing serious adverse effects, especially when used as an alternative to essential medical care. Oral  administration is not part of aromatherapy practice and should only be advised by medical practitioners who have been trained to use essential oils as medicines.  
     

There are several issues with these posts. First is the lack of understanding of the general public about the risks, as well as the benefits of therapies, notably aromatherapy oils. This is a continuing problem and experienced therapy practitioners, as well as conventional healthcare professionals, need to keep putting the message out there to the public.

 

Secondly, nurses (or midwives) who enthusiastically condone the use of complementary therapies or natural remedies without any knowledge or understanding of the potential dangers, are putting their patients in jeopardy, and risking mistakes that could lead to loss of their professional registration. This is particularly significant when people are seriously ill, since the therapies could complicate the medical condition or interact with drugs.

 

And thirdly, the credibility of professional therapy practitioners is seriously undermined by a few individuals who seek to overstep their boundaries. I have worked with many reputable practitioners of reflexology and other therapies who specialise in working with people with diagnosed conditions, especially cancer patients or expectant parents. They have undertaken additional training and understand how to apply their experience of using the therapy to the physiology and pathology of the person’s condition. 

 



A New Book On The Horizon!

Published : 30/01/2021

We are delighted to announce that Denise has received the advance copies of her new book, Using Natural Remedies Safely in Pregnancy and Childbirth, to be published by Singing Dragon in mid-March 2021.

If you would like to win a signed copy of the book, please emailinfo@expectancy.co.uk with the answer to the question below, your email address and your name as you would like it in the book if you win. The draw will be made on Friday 12th February.

Here’s the question: If an expectant parent wishes to take  raspberry leaf to facilitate labour, when should it be commenced?

a) 37-38 weeks’ gestation

b) 30-32 weeks’ gestation

c) 40-41week’s gestation



Brave New World...online learning

Published : 25/01/2021

Denise has been extremely busy since the new year preparing for all the online teaching. We've already had one course this year on aromatherapy in midwifery, with rave reviews, one midwife emailing us afterwards to say it's the best course she's done in a long time. Over the next two weeks, Denise has courses for midwives and therapists in China and Japan, as well as upcoming webinars and a post dates pregnancy course.

Denise says:


It's been an interesting time, moving to teaching online but there are certainly benefits. Rather than being constrained by the size of an actual  room, we've been able to give more midwives and birth workers the opportunity to study with us, with some overseas groups having up to 200 students. We run our study days in real time with three 2-hour sessions (and breaks between), from 9am to 4pm. This can be quite intensive so we break the day up with group work and time to chat socially. Students receive everything in advance so they have all the course materials. For the aromatherapy and post dates pregnancy courses, midwives receive a set of aromatherapy oils to use during the care planning sessions, and those on our acupuncture course receive a set of needles, a mini sharps bin and a practice pad (better than sticking needles in an orange which is now we practised to give injections!). I seem to spend my time packaging up parcels and getting them shipped off. We're also getting more students from overseas, with midwives joining us from Malta, Cyprus, Italy, Austria, Qatar and Slovenia. This has led us to offer the option to study our Certificate in Midwifery Complementary Therapies completely online, with ten study days, optional extra webinars, "open house" sessions and tutorials, taken over an academic year.



January Webinar News

Published : 15/01/2021

Join our online webinars on complementary therapies for pregnancy and childbirth 



Date - Saturday 23rd January 2021  10:00 - 11:00 hours

Subject - Introduction to reflexology in midwifery practice with Denise Tiran, author of Reflexology for Pregnancy and Childbirth

 





Introduction to the principles of reflexology, the different types of reflexology used around the world and the benefits of using reflex zone therapy, the style taught by Expectancy, in midwifery practice. Suitable for midwives and students

·      All webinars cost £20 – or book any two for £36.

·      Book via info@expectancy.co.uk

·      Full payment is required by direct bank transfer before we send the access link for your chosen webinar

·      Certificate of attendance emailed to you after the webinar

 



Pineapples and Fertility

Published : 04/01/2021

Pineapple has long been held as a symbol of fertility and is also often used to trigger labour contractions in women who are overdue. Pineapple core contains a chemical called bromelain which has been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties and possibly also some anti-cancer effects. When fertility issues are linked to internal scar tissue, perhaps caused by infection or previous surgery, it is thought that bromelain may reduce the inflammation and aid conception. It is also thought to have certain anti-coagulant (blood thinning) effects which is why it is thought to aid blood flow to the uterus. To date there is no pure research on the potential for bromelain to aid fertility and most of the information available on the subject appears to be based on a 2012 Indian paper which was a review of much older research.

However, for those who want to harness the fresh, bright image of pineapple as an aid to conception, there is no real problem unless you are allergic to pineapple or to latex or experience tingling in the mouth when eating pineapple (which may be the start of a more significant allergy). The main source of bromelain is in the fresh raw core of the pineapple, and it is destroyed by juicing, canning or cooking. Those taking prescribed aspirin or other blood thinning drugs prescribed to aid fertility should avoid eating large amounts of the core. Once pregnant, pineapple should be eaten only in moderation, avoiding the central fibrous core.



Christmas Foods And Spices

Published : 24/12/2020

In the week before Christmas, Denise explores the medicinal uses of some of the popular Christmas spices and foods.

Cinnamon and cloves are both used extensively in cooking at this time of year and are safe in the small amounts used in cooking. Cinnamon is effective for various digestive conditions, but the essential oil is also used in some countries to stimulate labour at term, so should be avoided during pregnancy. This means that the oil should not be added to aromatherapy diffusers to fragrance the room if there is anyone in the family who is pregnant – or if there are cats or dogs in the house as it is toxic to animals. Clove is another popular spice, and the oil is sometimes used to treat toothache, but should be avoided in pregnancy. In some countries clove oil is used to ease the pain of teething in babies, but this can cause damage to the emerging teeth if the oil is rubbed into the baby’s mouth and gums. Like cinnamon, clove oil is also toxic to dogs and cats.

Many people like to add cranberry sauce to their Christmas dinner, but did you know that it can be used medicinally for urinary problems? Pregnant women are prone to urinary infections and cranberry juice can be a useful preventative – but it must be sugar free juice. A few people are allergic to cranberries, especially those who have asthma or who are allergic to aspirin and excessive consumption of the juice can cause irritation when passing urine.

Who doesn’t enjoy a few dates from those little wooden boxes at Christmas? However, whilst dried dates are suitable for pregnant women, fresh Medjool dates should be eaten in small amounts if you are pregnant. Research has shown that eating several large fresh dates every day in the last weeks of pregnancy can trigger labour contractions – but it’s best not to go mad on them at Christmas if you are not yet ready to give birth. Indeed, in some Middle Eastern countries dates are considered to be “forbidden fruits” in pregnancy. 

Frankincenseevokes the sense of Christmas, perhaps more than any other spice. It is, however, a useful medicinal plant, being antiseptic and very good for colds and nasal congestion. The essential oil is a particularly useful one for stress and anxiety and is what Denise calls “the ultimate calmer”. It is especially effective for the transition stage of labour, just before the baby is ready to be born – just sniffing a couple of drops on a tissue calms you down (don’t put it in the birthing pool). If using it in a diffuser at home, just turn it on for 15-20 minutes – this is enough to fragrance the room for a good couple of hours and avoids overwhelming the air with the chemicals in the oil as it can cause headaches or nausea in some people.



Previous articles

The Misuse of Complementary Therapies

A New Book On The Horizon!

Brave New World...online learning

January Webinar News

Pineapples and Fertility

Christmas Foods And Spices

How Antenatal Education Has Changed

Being Professional

Expectancy Licensed Consultancy Explained

Chips With Everything