Denise and her blog


Denise Tiran FRCM, is an international authority on midwifery complementary therapies.

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Expectancy Licensed Consultancy Explained

Published : 20/11/2020

Denise is having a busy week in the office, preparing the prospectus for the new.academic year's courses. She is delighted, but not surprised, already to have received applications for our unique Diploma in Midwifery Complementary Therapies for next September from some very enthusiastic midwives, several of them wanting to combine this with our Licensed Consultancy scheme for private practice. However she questions why so.many.midwives in the last.few.years have been keen to explore the move into having their own businesses offering maternity services such as complementary therapies,. antenatal classes and breast feeding support. Denise says:

Midwives love caring for expectant parents but need also to care for themselves. Midwives are leaving the NHS in droves, newly qualified midwives are choosing not to practise and older midwives are retiring early - and it seems as if this is due, at least in part, to burnout. It may also be due to the insidious erosion of the midwife's role or the risk-averse, litigation-conscious, blame-throwing culture of the NHS.

Conversely, midwives are beginning to realise that the NHS doesn't own them and that they are entitled to use their considerable skills,.knowledge and.expertise to.provide women with what they want - services that are generally not available on the NHS. In the UK there is a grave misconception amongst midwives (and nurses) that they are trained by - and therefore solely for - the NHS but this simply isn't true. Qualification grants midwives a licence to practise midwifery anywhere and in whatever way they choose, subject to national law and professional regulations.

Further, there is a demand from expectant parents for services to be available that provide them with services that ease their progress through pregnancy and birth and transition to becoming a parent. These services are not available in the NHS largely because the maternity services are obstetric-led for the benefit of the majority of users. The maternity services remain focused on the biological (physical) wellbeing of pregnancy and, give less credence to the psychosocial elements.

Pregnancy is a stressful time, more so now than ever before. To be able to call upon a professional who can provide relaxation treatments such as massage or reflexology, antenatal advice and support or specialist services to ease backache, nausea or avoid induction of labour is very appealing to many during pregnancy, and expectant parents are often prepared to pay for them.

Our team of Expectancy-trained midwives working in private practice is growing and more and more women are discovering the benefits of having the support they can offer. This current academic year we had more midwives than ever before choosing to join us to train as Licensed Consultants so that they too can provide a range of complementary therapy services for expectant and new parents. Why don't you come and join us?



Chips With Everything

Published : 15/11/2020

Denise was delighted to receive a ‘phone call this week from an old friend, Fiona. Denise, who developed and managed the BSc (Hons) degree in complementary therapies at the University of Greenwich, and Fiona, who was a health visitor, were lecturers in complementary therapies in the 1990s and early 2000s and were both instrumental in promoting the practice of complementary therapies within their respective professions. As is the way when you have not heard from someone for a while, they fell to reminiscing about the “good old days”. Denise left the University of Greenwich in December 2004 to set up Expectancy and Fiona reminded her of those early forays into freelance work.

Denise had arranged her very first private aromatherapy course for midwives and had booked a room in a small local hotel to run the course for eight weeks on a Tuesday evening from 5-8 pm. Nearing the day, she was worried that only four midwives had booked on the course and she asked Fiona if she should cancel it – to which Fiona replied “absolutely not!”. In order to boost numbers to a viable group, Denise then offered the course at a knock-down price to some of her midwifery friends, asking them to act as a pilot, so in the end there were eight midwives who attended. 

The course was not without a few issues. The hotel room overlooked the car park and the windows did not have curtains wide enough to close – so when the midwives were due to do the practical work, including back massage for labour, they had to tape all their coats over the windows to stop hotel residents coming in from the car park from looking into the room. Another problem was that all the midwives had rushed to the hotel ready to start the course at the end of an already tiring day of clinical work. Denise had originally requested teas and coffees to be available – but the midwives were so hungry and tired on that first day that she ordered chips to be brought in with the drinks. This became the routine every week and it was great fun studying aromatherapy whilst munching on hot chips with salt and vinegar – but Denise does admit that it meant she made no profit at all from that first course! Thankfully, things have improved and although she no longer provides chips with the courses, midwives still keep coming and Denise has now taught complementary therapies such as aromatherapy to over 3000 midwives since starting her business in 2004. Fiona was obviously right then!



Are Complementary Therapies Safe In Pregnancy 

Published : 08/11/2020

The use of complementary therapies (CTs) by expectant parents is at an all-time high – but are they actually safe? Today, Dr Denise Tiran considers the minefield around the advice available to those expecting a baby who wish to use therapies such as aromatherapy, acupuncture, reflexology and herbal medicine. She says: 

The advice pages on www.NHS.org.uk take a cautious approach to CTs, stating that there is generally insufficient research evidence to support their use during pregnancy, yet making blanket statements for the apparent safety of massage, aromatherapy and (incorrectly) ginger for pregnancy sickness. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) goes further by actively discouraging women from using modalities that, they suggest, are inadequately researched. Similarly, Cochrane systematic reviews, whilst being somewhat more sympathetic, also consider the inadequacy of research on the safety of CTs for pregnancy and birth. Unfortunately, these national guidelines fail to acknowledge the huge number of expectant parents seeking support from professional therapists or – more worryingly – self-administering natural remedies. CTs such as massage, aromatherapy, and reflexology are commonly used for relaxation; acupuncture and hypnotherapy are accessed for the treatment of specific physical and emotional symptoms. Natural remedies (NRs), including aromatherapy oils, herbal medicines and homeopathic remedies, are increasingly being used at home to prepare for and encourage the onset of labour. 

The issue of research evidence is almost irrelevant if CTs and NRs continue to be used by expectant parents (and by those attempting to conceive). Certainly, the amount of evidence available is limited and largely explores the effectiveness of different CTs – it is impossible to conduct formal research into the safety of different types of CTs. So how should maternity professionals advise expectant parents about CTs and NRs? It is a difficult balancing act for midwives, doctors, doulas and others providing care for the pregnant population. Simply advising against CTs and NRs risks people using them surreptitiously without informing their maternity care providers. Avoiding the subject altogether similarly risks people taking remedies or receiving CTs which may be inappropriate at that time and potentially harmful. Lack of knowledge amongst health professionals risks them giving inaccurate or – more often - incomplete information which may equally compromise maternal, fetal or pregnancy wellbeing. Conversely, advocating the benefits of CTs and NRs without adequate and specific knowledge, may lead to side effects and complication from inappropriate use.

Suggested guidelines for maternity professionals and complementary therapy practitioners working with expectant parents:

  • Enquire about clients’ use of CTS and NRs prior to and during pregnancy – at booking and at various stages throughout pregnancy
  • Advise caution with ALL CTs and NRs unless prescribed or administered by a fully qualified practitioner
  • Advise extreme caution with herbal remedies including herbal teas, which may have adverse effects such as blood thinning or toxicity
  • Maternity professionals should be adequately trained and insured to administer / advise on CTs and NRs
  • CTs practitioners should be trained and insured to treat pregnant clients
  • Communication between maternity professionals and complementary practitioners should be encouraged
  • If in doubt, do not use – especially if there are any individual medical or obstetric complications
  • Less is more – never exceed the dose, duration or frequency of administration of any CTs / NRs
  • Remember – “natural” does not always mean “safe”



Fantastic news!!!!

Published : 27/10/2020

We are delighted to announce that our very own Denise Tiran, CEO and Education Director for Expectancy, has been awarded an honorary doctorate by the University of Greenwich for her pioneering work in developing “complementary therapies” as a specialist area of practice, education, research and publication in midwifery. Her award was conferred at a graduation ceremony held mostly online on 27th October, but Denise was able to visit the University and receive her award in person from the Vice Chancellor (socially distanced, of course).

Denise, who also received a Fellowship from the Royal College of Midwives in 2018, says;

I am so proud to receive this honour from the University of Greenwich where I spent many happy years as a midwifery lecturer and had the opportunity to develop the UK’s first practice-based BSc (honours) degree in complementary therapies. I feel the award acknowledges the area of complementary therapies as a specific discipline and aids the credibility of a subject that still has many sceptics. This award is not only for me; it is for all those midwives who are interested in complementary therapies, all those I have taught, both in the University and, since 2004, via my own company, Expectancy, around the world. Most of all, it is for my son, Adam, who makes it all worthwhile – looking forward to celebrating with friends and family when circumstances allow us to be together again.



Previous articles

Expectancy Licensed Consultancy Explained

Chips With Everything

Are Complementary Therapies Safe In Pregnancy 

Fantastic news!!!!

Changing Childbirth

Absolute Aromas

World Mental Health Day

Complementary Therapies Explained

In honour of National Curry Week (5th to 11th October) Denise questions whether curry will bring on labour

Celebrating World Reflexology Week