Denise and her blog


Denise Tiran FRCM, is an international authority on midwifery complementary therapies.

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How Times Change

Published : 28/02/2021

Here Denise reflects on changing times in the pregnancy and birth arena and considers how stressful life is now compared to 40 years ago.

She says:


When I was first a midwife in the mid-1970s women either became pregnant or they didn't, but everyone accepted that nature would take its course. There were very few tests for fetal abnormalities, no electronic monitoring in labour and limited vaccinations for infants. If women worked, they took maternity leave from around 32 weeks of pregnancy and often chose to be full time parents, not returning to work until several years later. Midwives had time to spend with women at all stages, with frequent antenatal appointments. Home births were still quite common but even in hospital there was continued one to one care in labour. And the midwife provided welcome daily postnatal visits to the home for at least ten days after the birth. 


In today's world, couples often leave it "physiologically late" to start a family, then are so stressed that conception takes longer than they want, or not at all. Pregnancy is stressful while women strive to continue working until the last moment, and to cope with "unexpected" - but completely normal - discomforts of pregnancy symptoms. Labour is "managed" either by the couple or by professionals instead of being helped to follow its natural course. New parents, who have generally given birth in hospital, have no time to recover from interventionist care before being thrown into the stressful world of attempting to be a "perfect parent".


Society expects perfection but nature isn't perfect and sometimes it lets us down. Extra social and medical choices are welcome but too much choice brings uncertainty - and uncertainty brings more stress. Stress increases hormones that interfere with conception, pregnancy and labour, recovery from birth and establishment of lactation.


The internet - and particularly social media - exacerbates expectant parent's distress, with childbirth tales, either of perfection or disaster. From the posts I'm currently seeing, there is a definite "them and us" attitude amongst a proportion of the pregnant public, spreading fear that midwives and doctors are ogres to be avoided at all costs, who will "make" parents accept care against their will and who are uncaring and unkind. 
This saddens me greatly, to think that we've lost the respect of the people for whom we care. It saddens me, too, to see posts from students and newly qualified midwives who are so disillusioned with the maternity services that they feel they can no longer work in them. Yet these are the very people we need to take forward, to develop and improve the maternity services we offer. Recognising the problem is part of the solution, but we need motivated midwives to work on achieving the solution.


As long as I've been a midwife, there have been battles in the field of pregnancy and birth: midwives versus obstetricians, natural versus interventionist birth, parents versus professionals. But we're all there for the same reason: fundamentally, to continue the human race. Let's stop the fighting and start working together to improve services for expectant parents. Let's start respecting one another for the amazing work we do - respecting women's bodies for their ability to conceive, grow, birth and nurture babies.A nd respecting professionals who are, after all, there to help families, to ensure a safe and satisfying passage through the journey that is pregnancy, birth and parenthood.



The Misuse of Complementary Therapies

Published : 14/02/2021

 

Today, Denise expresses her continued concern about the continuing misuse of complementary therapies and and reinforces the need for both complementary and conventional health practitioners work within their professional boundaries. She says: 

 

I continue to see some extremely alarming social media comments and suggestions on the use of complementary therapies. Some of the posts recently have included:

 

  • A woman whose husband is in intensive care being ventilated for Covid, whose nurses agreed that it was acceptable for her to bring in an essential oil diffuser to “ease his breathing”. This is one of the most worrying incidents I have seen. Whist diffusion of specific oils may aid respiration for people recovering from Covid at home, the very fact that this man is in ITU means that he needs specialist medical and nursing care and aromatherapy is completely contraindicated at this time. Further, it is frankly irresponsible of the nursing staff to agree to this: obviously they have no understanding of the dangers of diffusing oils in an area where people are in life-threatening conditions and how they may affect, not only this man, but other patients in the unit.
     
  • Various reflexology “professional” groups with numerous questions asking whether reflexology can “heal” particular medical conditions or  what reflexology treatment should be done to treat specific medical conditions. These questions are usually followed by numerous helpful suggestions from therapists who obviously do not understand the pathology of the conditions being discussed and do not appreciate their professional boundaries. Some of the conditions mentioned are so serious that the reflexologist should not be treating them at all yet there appear to be no posts urging caution, just total amateurish enthusiasm. In any case, reflexologists are not permitted to treat medical conditions unless they have undertaken extra training, are insured and preferably also communicate with the relevant medical doctor.
     
  • Reflexologists posting pictures of feet and asking what various changes mean, for example, lines, bulges or cracks on the feet. I have discussed this before and it worries me that these people make sweeping statements and  giving supposed “diagnoses” without any knowledge of the person’s history, symptoms or other factors that need to be taken into account when treating clients.
     
  • Certain essential oil companies advocating that oils can be taken by mouth as medicines. Again, this irresponsible publicly-available information is extremely dangerous and risks causing serious adverse effects, especially when used as an alternative to essential medical care. Oral  administration is not part of aromatherapy practice and should only be advised by medical practitioners who have been trained to use essential oils as medicines.  
     

There are several issues with these posts. First is the lack of understanding of the general public about the risks, as well as the benefits of therapies, notably aromatherapy oils. This is a continuing problem and experienced therapy practitioners, as well as conventional healthcare professionals, need to keep putting the message out there to the public.

 

Secondly, nurses (or midwives) who enthusiastically condone the use of complementary therapies or natural remedies without any knowledge or understanding of the potential dangers, are putting their patients in jeopardy, and risking mistakes that could lead to loss of their professional registration. This is particularly significant when people are seriously ill, since the therapies could complicate the medical condition or interact with drugs.

 

And thirdly, the credibility of professional therapy practitioners is seriously undermined by a few individuals who seek to overstep their boundaries. I have worked with many reputable practitioners of reflexology and other therapies who specialise in working with people with diagnosed conditions, especially cancer patients or expectant parents. They have undertaken additional training and understand how to apply their experience of using the therapy to the physiology and pathology of the person’s condition. 

 



Previous articles

How Times Change

The Misuse of Complementary Therapies

A New Book On The Horizon!

Brave New World...online learning

January Webinar News

Pineapples and Fertility

Christmas Foods And Spices

How Antenatal Education Has Changed

Being Professional

Expectancy Licensed Consultancy Explained