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Denise Tiran FRCM, is an international authority on midwifery complementary therapies.

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January Webinar News

Published : 15/01/2021

Join our online webinars on complementary therapies for pregnancy and childbirth 



Date - Saturday 23rd January 2021  10:00 - 11:00 hours

Subject - Introduction to reflexology in midwifery practice with Denise Tiran, author of Reflexology for Pregnancy and Childbirth

 





Introduction to the principles of reflexology, the different types of reflexology used around the world and the benefits of using reflex zone therapy, the style taught by Expectancy, in midwifery practice. Suitable for midwives and students

·      All webinars cost £20 – or book any two for £36.

·      Book via info@expectancy.co.uk

·      Full payment is required by direct bank transfer before we send the access link for your chosen webinar

·      Certificate of attendance emailed to you after the webinar

 



Pineapples and Fertility

Published : 04/01/2021

Pineapple has long been held as a symbol of fertility and is also often used to trigger labour contractions in women who are overdue. Pineapple core contains a chemical called bromelain which has been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties and possibly also some anti-cancer effects. When fertility issues are linked to internal scar tissue, perhaps caused by infection or previous surgery, it is thought that bromelain may reduce the inflammation and aid conception. It is also thought to have certain anti-coagulant (blood thinning) effects which is why it is thought to aid blood flow to the uterus. To date there is no pure research on the potential for bromelain to aid fertility and most of the information available on the subject appears to be based on a 2012 Indian paper which was a review of much older research.

However, for those who want to harness the fresh, bright image of pineapple as an aid to conception, there is no real problem unless you are allergic to pineapple or to latex or experience tingling in the mouth when eating pineapple (which may be the start of a more significant allergy). The main source of bromelain is in the fresh raw core of the pineapple, and it is destroyed by juicing, canning or cooking. Those taking prescribed aspirin or other blood thinning drugs prescribed to aid fertility should avoid eating large amounts of the core. Once pregnant, pineapple should be eaten only in moderation, avoiding the central fibrous core.



Christmas Foods And Spices

Published : 24/12/2020

In the week before Christmas, Denise explores the medicinal uses of some of the popular Christmas spices and foods.

Cinnamon and cloves are both used extensively in cooking at this time of year and are safe in the small amounts used in cooking. Cinnamon is effective for various digestive conditions, but the essential oil is also used in some countries to stimulate labour at term, so should be avoided during pregnancy. This means that the oil should not be added to aromatherapy diffusers to fragrance the room if there is anyone in the family who is pregnant – or if there are cats or dogs in the house as it is toxic to animals. Clove is another popular spice, and the oil is sometimes used to treat toothache, but should be avoided in pregnancy. In some countries clove oil is used to ease the pain of teething in babies, but this can cause damage to the emerging teeth if the oil is rubbed into the baby’s mouth and gums. Like cinnamon, clove oil is also toxic to dogs and cats.

Many people like to add cranberry sauce to their Christmas dinner, but did you know that it can be used medicinally for urinary problems? Pregnant women are prone to urinary infections and cranberry juice can be a useful preventative – but it must be sugar free juice. A few people are allergic to cranberries, especially those who have asthma or who are allergic to aspirin and excessive consumption of the juice can cause irritation when passing urine.

Who doesn’t enjoy a few dates from those little wooden boxes at Christmas? However, whilst dried dates are suitable for pregnant women, fresh Medjool dates should be eaten in small amounts if you are pregnant. Research has shown that eating several large fresh dates every day in the last weeks of pregnancy can trigger labour contractions – but it’s best not to go mad on them at Christmas if you are not yet ready to give birth. Indeed, in some Middle Eastern countries dates are considered to be “forbidden fruits” in pregnancy. 

Frankincenseevokes the sense of Christmas, perhaps more than any other spice. It is, however, a useful medicinal plant, being antiseptic and very good for colds and nasal congestion. The essential oil is a particularly useful one for stress and anxiety and is what Denise calls “the ultimate calmer”. It is especially effective for the transition stage of labour, just before the baby is ready to be born – just sniffing a couple of drops on a tissue calms you down (don’t put it in the birthing pool). If using it in a diffuser at home, just turn it on for 15-20 minutes – this is enough to fragrance the room for a good couple of hours and avoids overwhelming the air with the chemicals in the oil as it can cause headaches or nausea in some people.



Previous articles

January Webinar News

Pineapples and Fertility

Christmas Foods And Spices

How Antenatal Education Has Changed

Being Professional

Expectancy Licensed Consultancy Explained

Chips With Everything

Are Complementary Therapies Safe In Pregnancy 

Fantastic news!!!!

Changing Childbirth